Just Another February Day

Who really wins on Valentine’s Day? The multi-million dollar industries more than the couples who express their love

By Jed Howell

Each year in the weeks leading to Valentine’s Day we are bombarded with advertisements of expensive diamonds, fancy chocolates, and flower bouquets that couldn’t possibly fit in a vase. All of these items come with a hefty price tag, but for what? So that on February 14th your significant other remembers that you love them? As if you don’t the other 364 days of the year. Not to mention the profit that companies make off cheesy cards and  heart shaped chocolates that cost nearly nothing to produce.

Personally, my problem with Valentine’s Day is the idea of having a designated day of the year to show affection. If you love someone enough to enter a relationship with them, then you should be affectionate as often as possible. Valentine’s Day is also more stressful than any normal day. Unrealistic or unclear expectations often result in catastrophe. I’m sure we have all agreed with our significant other that we would not exchange gifts when, in reality, they were expecting some sort of gesture. This day creates a feeling of manufactured or artificial love that couldn’t possibly be expressed any other day of the year.

The other problem with Valentine’s Day is the business side of the holiday. It has been estimated by the Greeting Card Association that each year more than 190 million Valentine’s Day cards are sent. This statistic excludes cards exchanged by children. Businesses thrive on the idea that a paper card with a heart on the front can prove that you care about someone. We have literally put a price on love, $133.91 to be exact. Yes, that is how much each American spends for Valentine’s day on average.

As consumerism tightens its deadly grip on yet another holiday, we may officially place Valentine’s Day in the category of “Hallmark holiday.”  The day of love has been tainted by price markups and big business.

Hidden Gems: Pieology & KouZina

By Jedidiah Howell and Caden Koenig

Subway, when it first started, became a pioneer for food service when we recognized its impact on ordering food. Subway set the bar for sandwiches, and now we see new people pushing that bar higher. In search of restaurants with a similar serving style, we headed to downtown Ann Arbor. This brought us to Pieology and KouZina.

Pieology

Only hearing about this new pizza place made us curious to how it would work with having a subway style order. Worries arose such as how long will it take? How much food will there actually be? Is it expensive?

Immediately walking into the restaurant some worries left as we scoped out pizzas from different tables on the way to the line. On the wall one menu stands with the best combinations of their pizzas, but they also let you create your own.

Photographer - Jed Howell
Photographer – Jed Howell

Along with the easy ordering process the atmosphere was nice. It was very modern and relaxed resembling a Chipotle-type vibe.

A big aid to the comfortable atmosphere was the customer service. The employees were easy going and well trained. After ordering and paying for our meal the waiting began. The music in the background and the comfortable booths made our five minute wait feel much shorter.

The fresh ingredients gave each bite its own flavorful experience. The only downfall to this pizza was that the eight pieces only lasted us about two minutes. To be fair there were three of us; however, for some it may be small for two people. This could change how the prices resonate.

At the $12 price point, one pizza would make a perfect lunch date or quick snack, but for a full dinner you may consider looking elsewhere.

The pizzas were very tasty, but if you are purchasing multiple pizzas the price starts to add up quickly. The overall restaurant was fantastic and we expect to be back soon. It seems Pieology has mastered the subway-serving style of one of the most beloved foods: pizza.

KouZina

As a fairly new restaurant in the Ann Arbor area, KouZina is relatively unknown, but we expect that to change. The first thing we noticed when we walked into KouZina was the modern, industrial style that occupies the space.

Another profound feature when entering the restaurant was the noise of the blaring music. The music was our only complaint concerning atmosphere. Once we got over the annoyance of the loud techno beats the experience was quite pleasant.

Photographer - Jed Howell
Photographer – Jed Howell

The ordering process began with the choice between a gyro, bowl or salad. We opted for the bowl mainly for sharing purposes. We were then helped down a line with a variety of toppings that we could add to our entrée.

In the end, we had a decent amount of food for under $10. The ordering experience was comparable to that of Chipotle or Subway. Personally, we thought the food was great; however, this was our first experience with greek food. We did find that we had an abundance of rice when comparing toppings.

The service was great as they were very quick allowing us to get in and out of the restaurant in less than twenty minutes. They were also quite friendly and helpful.

Our overall experience was positive, and we would definitely recommend for a lunch or quick dinner out.

Fall Athletes to Watch

Here are some key athletes of their respective teams who you should keep an eye on this season

By Jed Howell

Joey Hiser/Football:

It’s hard to talk about the last decade of Dexter football without mentioning the Hiser name. Hiser is the youngest of three brothers who have all played for Dexter. Both of his brothers went on to play at the collegiate level. This fall, Hiser is returning to the quarterback position after playing receiver the past three seasons. He played quarterback from the time he started tackle football in fourth grade all the way through middle school. “I’m really excited to be moving back to QB.”

Emma Tamer/Field Hockey:

Ever since her freshman year, Emma Tamer has been dominant on the field. With a state championship her sophomore year and a commitment to play at the University of Michigan coming soon after, Tamer is no stranger to success. However, last season came as a bit of a disappointment as the girls lost in the state semifinals to Ann Arbor Pioneer in a close game, 2-0. Tamer and the rest of the seniors are expected to make a push for a second state title. “I felt like our season had been cut short.”

Rylee Kim/Girls Golf:

As one of the most experienced golfers on the team, Rylee Kim is both a leader and role model for the rest of her teammates. Kim has been golfing since her freshman year. She began golfing in hopes of meeting new people and ended up falling in love with the sport. Kim wants to focus more on having fun this fall rather than winning. As the team’s No. 1 golfer, Kim likely will have a big impact on this team’s success throughout the year. “I’d also like to score a hole-in-one sometime soon.”

Marc Lopez/Boys Cross-country:

Throughout his high school career ,Marc Lopez has made his name as one of the fastest members on the cross country team. After a successful junior season ending in a team win at the regional meet and a chance to run in the state meet, Lopez has big goals for his senior year. He is looking to break the school record in the 5K and earn a spot for his name on the cross country wall. He would also like to see the team finish in the top two at the state meet. Lopez expects his senior season to be his best yet. “Individually, I would like to break the school record.”

Taylor Venuto/Volleyball:

Taylor Venuto stood as the only freshman on  the varsity volleyball team last season. Even though she was the youngest player and the new girl on the team, Venuto was able to make a major contribution as a middle and outside hitter. Now that she has a full season under her belt she can focus more on her game and less on getting to know everyone. Many are expecting Venuto’s sophomore season to be a big one with an even larger presence the court. “Now that Coach Dunn has seen me play a whole season, she has high expectations for me.”