Digging Into Dig Pink

What started as a coach honoring her mother has turned into a partnership between two rivals

By Alisha Birchmeier

In 1600, the first case of breast cancer was recognized in Edwin Smith Papyrus. Four centuries later, in 2007, Jean Atkinson was diagnosed with breast cancer. To most, this seems insignificant, but for Dexter and Chelsea’s high school volleyball teams, this started a new tradition.

Laura Cleveland, Chelsea’s varsity volleyball coach, started Dig Pink in honor of her mother, Jean Atkinson.

“When I first found out about Laura doing Dig Pink in my honor, I could’ve cried right there, but I knew I couldn’t,” Atkinson said.

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Save the Women

The real problem with the ‘Save The Boobs’ slogan

By tess alekseev

This month, you’re likely to see slogans like: “I Stare Because I Care” and “Save The Boobs!” While, yes, the messages are well-intentioned and (seemingly) very pro-feminist, the harsh reality is that these slogans only serve to make women affected by breast cancer feel even more isolated.

Why do the slogans have to focus so much on the breast, and not the woman? The fact is, most affected women have to undergo mastectomies, or breast removals, to get rid of the cancer. In order to save the woman herself from cancer, the breasts have to be sacrificed.

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Stories Behind the Ribbon

The accounts of a DHS graduate, current students and staff

By Jacoby Haley, Tessa Kipke, Evelyn Maxey & Heather Brouwer

For Nathaniel Burrell, the signs that led to the diagnoses of the cancer were nothing particularly out of the order at first.

“It all started with some trouble going to the bathroom,” Burrell said.

As this trouble progressed, he started to become more worried.

“It came to a point where – it sounds weird to say – nothing was coming out,” Burrell said.

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Autumn’s Fight Against Cancer

How keeping a strong mind and loving heart has helped her along the journey to surviving cancer
By Mika Brust & Lexi Heath

Autumn Campbell, beloved art teacher and staff member of DHS, has never touched a tanning bed in her life, nor has she been one of those people who laid out in the sun wearing baby oil.

However, in her mid-20’s, Autumn was first diagnosed with skin cancer on her face. On November 5, 2015, she received a call as she was walking into DHS that her cancer had come back, and this time it was far more aggressive.

“Melanoma is like other cancers, it can get into your lymph nodes and it can be invasive into your organs and so you would need treatment for melanoma like any other cancer with chemotherapy, radiation, surgery,” she said.

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