DHS Students Plan Walkout for School Safety

Protests will occur in schools around the United States as part of the #NeverAgain movement

by Isabella Franklin and Alisha Birchmeier

Throughout the country, students are protesting gun violence by walking out of school as part of a movement called “#NeverAgain.” American high schools have come up with a way to deal with these walkout protests, and Dexter High School is no exception to this. Several students at DHS are planning to participate in the scheduled national walkout protest on March 14 from 10:00 a.m. to 10:17 a.m. The protest lasts 17 minutes in order to honor the 17 victims of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas shooting. A later protest will also be occurring on April 20 at 10:00 a.m. in which students will leave school and not return until the end of the day.

Some Dexter students are participating in the protest because they believe that it will be an effective way to express their views and enact the change that they want to see, as opposed to just discussing the issue without action.

“I am participating because I feel that, to affect change, one needs to act instead of just talking about it and never getting anything done,” sophomore Kieran Grossman said.

For other students, there’s also an important moral and emotional aspect to these school protests.

“Gun laws need to change and people need to take action if they want that to happen,” senior Bri Walker said. “I think it’s also a form of respect for those who have died due to the shootings in the past.”

However, a massive protest that disrupts the school day can’t work without any regulation from the school. The Dexter Community School district administration has had several meetings amongst themselves and with students to form a defined set of rules around how teachers and students should behave during the protest on March 14.

“Mr. Koenig and Ms. Walls and I met with student leaders after school Wednesday to kinda talk about what they were intending to do,” principal Kit Moran said. “Our preference for students is going to be students that are planning to participate in the walkout will walkout over the catwalk and out the main door that way, out towards the parking lot.

“Nobody’s gonna tackle a kid and say ‘don’t go in this direction,’ but we’re gonna encourage kids to do that.”

Several high schools have discouraged students from participating in these protests, both by suspending students who attempt to participate in spontaneous walkouts and by banning these walkouts completely. These schools have received backlash for not letting students protest.

“Student protests are important,” Grossman said. “They’ve proven to be important when studying history, so I don’t see why they wouldn’t be important now.”

Fortunately, Dexter students will be able to protest and express their political stances without any disciplinary action.

“We’re in the business of education, and I think for us there are what we call ‘teachable moments,’” Moran said. “I think the administration and teachers, generally speaking, think that this is a teachable moment for kids.”

According to an email from Principal Moran, students will not be penalized for walking out as long as they are back in class before 10 a.m. Teachers will be expected to partner with another teacher, so that there is one adult to monitor the students who stay in class and the students who decide to protest.

Some teachers are offering alternative options to walking out for their students who want to acknowledge the protest without leaving school.

“I would like to try and offer my students 17 minutes of silence in class during third hour around 10 a.m.,” art teacher Krickett Luckhardt said. “I just think that is a peaceful way to give the students closure while still, you know, letting them have their voice be heard in a way that they think might be safe enough. I just feel like the students want to stay behind but still want to participate should have an option to do something.”

To ensure student safety, no one but students and staff will be allowed on DHS’s campus from 9:45-11:00 a.m.

“The reason we’re gonna encourage them to stay in this spot is that we also are planning to basically block the entrances to the high school before that happens, about 9:45,” Moran said. “We’re gonna block the teacher lot and block the two entrances on Parker so that nobody can come or go. So, nobody’s coming onto the premises, if the kids go outside they should be safe.

“The other part of that is you can’t leave the premises, so if we’re blocking it, we’re blocking it … If you have a dentist’s appointment at 10:30 or 11 o’clock, you might wanna pick your child up ahead of time, because we’re not gonna want to be having people traipse back and forth, in and out.”

While some students have concerns about walking out of school harming their chances of getting into college, many colleges and universities have issued statements saying that peacefully protesting in this manner will not affect admissions chances or current enrollment. Among local universities, this includes Western Michigan University, Alma College, Albion College, Kalamazoo College, and the University of Michigan. Students throughout history have been great agents of social change, and this generation doesn’t seem to be any different.

Bond The Builder

Dexter begins improvements to school campuses with passage of $71.7 million bond

By Alisha Birchmeier

As trees are cut down and the ground is chopped up, emotions are flooding the Dexter community. Between angry parents voicing their opinions and the mixed emotions of students, the bond has become the center of conversation in the community.

The original plan was to clear twenty acres of trees to place the two fields; however when looking at the placing and size of the fields only seven or eight acres needed to be cut down. While there is a rumor that all of the trees will be replanted, that’s not true; only some of them will be. Healthy new trees will be placed along the roadside to block the fields’ view from the road. Continue reading “Bond The Builder”

Desk Job to Road Patrol

After break, Officer Visel and his K-9, Karn, will be taking Officer Hilobuk’s place as Dexter’s resource officer

By Evelyn Maxey and Alisha Birchmeier

After five years of working in Dexter schools, an officer typically gets reassigned. The past two officers at Dexter High School have been here for longer with Officer Jeremy Hilobuk being here for eight years, and before him, Officer Paul Mobbs was here for 10.               

“Things were going well in the district, and my kids were going through the schools,” Officer Hilobuk said.

When he was in high school, Officer Hilobuk took interest in becoming a police officer. Hilobuk took business classes in college, and realized that wasn’t what he wanted to do. He then changed his field of study to criminal justice.

Continue reading “Desk Job to Road Patrol”

The Hidden Gems Review

Casey’s Tavern: Ann Arbor’s local favorite since 1986

By Alisha Birchmeier, Bailey Welshans

Tucked away between townhouses and old buildings in Ann Arbor stands Casey’s Tavern, an easy-to-miss  restaurant, since the sign is raised so high on the building. Casey’s is known for its authentic, home-style food and, more specifically, their reuben. When we visited the restaurant we were greeted by a manager who told us there was a booth in the back we could sit in. Having to scoot through people, we felt very uncomfortable and claustrophobic. We didn’t like that we could easily hear the conversation of the people not even two feet away from us.

Above, the shrimp & Chicken Caesar Salad and to the left is the Cheeseburger. Both were good!

We decided to order onion rings, even though neither of us are quite big fans of them, just to try them out. After about fifteen minutes, we received our drinks and our appetizer. The onion rings were by far the best either of us has ever had!

Continue reading “The Hidden Gems Review”

Stories Behind the Ribbon

The accounts of a DHS graduate, current students and staff

By Jacoby Haley, Tessa Kipke, Evelyn Maxey & Heather Brouwer

For Nathaniel Burrell, the signs that led to the diagnoses of the cancer were nothing particularly out of the order at first.

“It all started with some trouble going to the bathroom,” Burrell said.

As this trouble progressed, he started to become more worried.

“It came to a point where – it sounds weird to say – nothing was coming out,” Burrell said.

Continue reading “Stories Behind the Ribbon”

New Year, Same Football?

After another 0-9 season did Coach Jacobs really make any changes to the football program?

By Kellen Porter

Last year, Coach Koenig was let go after going 1-35 in four years giving Dexter football the worst losing streak of all of the high school football programs in Michigan.

Coach Phil Jacobs was hired to be a motivator and rebuild Dexter to its former glory, he was working the kids extra hard in the weight room and on the field, making sure that the team would be ready for those close games in the fourth quarter and have the energy to pull out the win. Unfortunately, there were no close fourth quarters as the team went 0-9 for the fourth season in a row.

Continue reading “New Year, Same Football?”

Digging Into Dig Pink

What started as a coach honoring her mother has turned into a partnership between two rivals

By Alisha Birchmeier

In 1600, the first case of breast cancer was recognized in Edwin Smith Papyrus. Four centuries later, in 2007, Jean Atkinson was diagnosed with breast cancer. To most, this seems insignificant, but for Dexter and Chelsea’s high school volleyball teams, this started a new tradition.

Laura Cleveland, Chelsea’s varsity volleyball coach, started Dig Pink in honor of her mother, Jean Atkinson.

“When I first found out about Laura doing Dig Pink in my honor, I could’ve cried right there, but I knew I couldn’t,” Atkinson said.

Continue reading “Digging Into Dig Pink”

The Anchor: S.P.A.C.E/One Club

Photographer – Alisha Birchmeier
Photographer - Alisha Birchmeier
Photographer – Alisha Birchmeier
Junior Makayla Tucker performs an untitled original song at the S.P.A.C.E/One Club fundraiser concert on Friday, November 11, in the CPA. It was Tucker’s first time performing for S.P.A.C.E. The clubs exceeded their goal and raised over $120.