Dreadbots

Balance is key for the Dexter Robotics Club

Not many students in Dexter High School know much about the robotics club, nor do they realize the effort the team puts into building robots for competitions. Most schools have their own team, with roughly 3000 teams nationally. Michigan is extremely competitive in the field of robotics, mainly due to the sheer amount of teams in the state: 422. That’s one-sixth of all the national teams in a single state. To stay competitive in this league, it’s a serious grind. Continue reading “Dreadbots”

Wheelchair Basketball

By Evelyn Maxey

The Social Justice Club hosts an annual wheelchair basketball game that raises money for veterans

In a world of negativity and animosity, light can be found in many things. Dexter High School has a new extracurricular addition which aims to provide support and acceptance to everyone in the community: The Social Justice Club.

“We aim to make our school and community a more equitable place by learning about, educating on, and acting on social issues,” said Ms. Hansen, a teacher coordinator for the club, “especially those affecting the most disadvantaged groups.”

With aims to make our school more open-minded, the Social Justice Club educates people on social issues, especially those involving disadvantaged groups. To raise awareness for one particular group, the they hosted a wheelchair basketball game between Army veterans and Navy veterans.

This event, that wouldn’t have been possible without the leadership of the game’s founder Gerald Hoff, was all about creating a more inclusive environment for veterans.

“This is an event all about veterans,” Hoff said, “It raises awareness about disability issues while emphasizing ability.”

Many veterans are wounded from service, which can isolate them from the rest of the world. These wounds can cause both a physical and emotional divide for veterans; to lessen that divide, we can find ways to support them and their wounds. Wheelchair basketball is a fun twist on regular basketball in that the players go back and forth on the court via wheelchairs to cater to the disabilities.

This passion has spread from Hoff to many Michigan football players. Former Michigan Quarterback and Placeholder Garrett Moores, who is heavily involved in the games, won the NCAA Holder of the Year award during his fifth and final year. His involvement in the games prompted his decision to continue supporting the charity the former winner chose to support, and continue to support veterans.

Additionally, all profits from the game went to the Ann Arbor Veterans Hospital.

“We basically looked up a ton of veteran charities, local and national, and the club decided they wanted to do a local charity,” Hansen said.

On Saturday March 3rd, both Army and Navy veterans suited up for wheelchair basketball.

Although the Army won with a final score of 59-44, the  game raised $1,051 which made this game was a slam dunk for both teams.

February/March Movie Reviews

February and March provide the best and worst the film industry has to offer

By Jimmy Fortuna-Peak

The 18th film in the MCU (Marvel Cinematic Universe) provides an amazing story, and the best cast the franchise has seen to date. Black Panther follows T’Challa, the king of the technologically advanced and isolated country of Wakanda, and the events that arise after he takes the throne from his recently deceased father. Chadwick Boseman does a perfect job of bringing T’Challa to the big screen, and Michael B. Jordan gives a near-perfect performance as the film’s villain, Erik Killmonger. The world-building is solid, and you feel as though you really know the world of Wakanda by the time the film ends. The ties to other MCU movies are subtle and don’t bog down the film whatsoever. The only thing the film suffers from is some below average visual effects throughout, however, this does not take away from the experience as a whole. Black Panther is one of the best superhero movies to come out in recent years and is one of the crown jewels of the MCU.

Rating: 4.5/5

Continue reading “February/March Movie Reviews”

Three-peat

What a surprise? Dreadnaughts are good in the water (again)

What’s better than going back-to-back in the state championships? 

Going back-to-back-to-back.

Just ask the Men’s Swim and Dive team.

The Dreadnaughts won the state competition for the third year in a row on March 10, increasing their Division II championship total to five. Dexter finished the meet with a score of 241.5, beating second-place Rochester Adams by 21.5 points

Continue reading “Three-peat”

Dexter’s Walkout

By Isabella Franklin

On March 14, students around the United States took a stand about school safety and the value of student lives.

DHS students headed out of the school’s front doors after second hour with signs and chalk to express their views on gun reform, school security, and changing the country’s system. The walkout mainly involved listening to student speeches given by seniors Marin Waddington and Joe Ramey and inscribing messages on the sidewalk in front of the school.

To protect and monitor the students during the walkout, there were teachers lined near the school’s entrance and buses blocking every road entrance.

“To me, it means that we get to see all of the people who believe that we need to have a change in what’s happening in schools, and people that believe it’s really bad that this is still happening, even in 2018,” sophomore Katie Schroeder said. “I hope that it’ll show that people really care about this and that a lot of people want to see this change, and hopefully it’ll make people more inclined to make a decision to change this.”

United They Stand

Truck line students join together to show their support for Florida shooting victims

By Bailey Welshans

Guns, flags, hateful comments, and more uproar.

Dexter High School had it all Wednesday morning.

At 10 AM this morning, students walked out of Dexter High School for 17 minutes in remembrance of the students who were killed during the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School school shooting in Parkland, Florida.

However, many feel it turned into much more.

Continue reading “United They Stand”

DHS Students Plan Walkout for School Safety

Protests will occur in schools around the United States as part of the #NeverAgain movement

by Isabella Franklin and Alisha Birchmeier

Throughout the country, students are protesting gun violence by walking out of school as part of a movement called “#NeverAgain.” American high schools have come up with a way to deal with these walkout protests, and Dexter High School is no exception to this. Several students at DHS are planning to participate in the scheduled national walkout protest on March 14 from 10:00 a.m. to 10:17 a.m. The protest lasts 17 minutes in order to honor the 17 victims of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas shooting. A later protest will also be occurring on April 20 at 10:00 a.m. in which students will leave school and not return until the end of the day.

Some Dexter students are participating in the protest because they believe that it will be an effective way to express their views and enact the change that they want to see, as opposed to just discussing the issue without action.

“I am participating because I feel that, to affect change, one needs to act instead of just talking about it and never getting anything done,” sophomore Kieran Grossman said.

For other students, there’s also an important moral and emotional aspect to these school protests.

“Gun laws need to change and people need to take action if they want that to happen,” senior Bri Walker said. “I think it’s also a form of respect for those who have died due to the shootings in the past.”

However, a massive protest that disrupts the school day can’t work without any regulation from the school. The Dexter Community School district administration has had several meetings amongst themselves and with students to form a defined set of rules around how teachers and students should behave during the protest on March 14.

“Mr. Koenig and Ms. Walls and I met with student leaders after school Wednesday to kinda talk about what they were intending to do,” principal Kit Moran said. “Our preference for students is going to be students that are planning to participate in the walkout will walkout over the catwalk and out the main door that way, out towards the parking lot.

“Nobody’s gonna tackle a kid and say ‘don’t go in this direction,’ but we’re gonna encourage kids to do that.”

Several high schools have discouraged students from participating in these protests, both by suspending students who attempt to participate in spontaneous walkouts and by banning these walkouts completely. These schools have received backlash for not letting students protest.

“Student protests are important,” Grossman said. “They’ve proven to be important when studying history, so I don’t see why they wouldn’t be important now.”

Fortunately, Dexter students will be able to protest and express their political stances without any disciplinary action.

“We’re in the business of education, and I think for us there are what we call ‘teachable moments,’” Moran said. “I think the administration and teachers, generally speaking, think that this is a teachable moment for kids.”

According to an email from Principal Moran, students will not be penalized for walking out as long as they are back in class before 10 a.m. Teachers will be expected to partner with another teacher, so that there is one adult to monitor the students who stay in class and the students who decide to protest.

Some teachers are offering alternative options to walking out for their students who want to acknowledge the protest without leaving school.

“I would like to try and offer my students 17 minutes of silence in class during third hour around 10 a.m.,” art teacher Krickett Luckhardt said. “I just think that is a peaceful way to give the students closure while still, you know, letting them have their voice be heard in a way that they think might be safe enough. I just feel like the students want to stay behind but still want to participate should have an option to do something.”

To ensure student safety, no one but students and staff will be allowed on DHS’s campus from 9:45-11:00 a.m.

“The reason we’re gonna encourage them to stay in this spot is that we also are planning to basically block the entrances to the high school before that happens, about 9:45,” Moran said. “We’re gonna block the teacher lot and block the two entrances on Parker so that nobody can come or go. So, nobody’s coming onto the premises, if the kids go outside they should be safe.

“The other part of that is you can’t leave the premises, so if we’re blocking it, we’re blocking it … If you have a dentist’s appointment at 10:30 or 11 o’clock, you might wanna pick your child up ahead of time, because we’re not gonna want to be having people traipse back and forth, in and out.”

While some students have concerns about walking out of school harming their chances of getting into college, many colleges and universities have issued statements saying that peacefully protesting in this manner will not affect admissions chances or current enrollment. Among local universities, this includes Western Michigan University, Alma College, Albion College, Kalamazoo College, and the University of Michigan. Students throughout history have been great agents of social change, and this generation doesn’t seem to be any different.

Guns: Do Something

By Joe Ramey

Recently, progression has been a hard idea to grasp. The laws surrounding the use and acquisition of firearms in the United States are clear, yet the second amendment itself is outdated and riddled with grey areas. With recent tragedies in mind, reform is essential now more than ever.

Though the Bill of Rights states that every United States citizen has the right to own a firearm, that does not mean that all legal guns are comparable in way of caliber and potential damage. The right to bear arms grants U.S citizens the ability to purchase and lawfully use firearms. This right is highly debated because it makes the purchasing of deadly weapons easier.

Continue reading “Guns: Do Something”