The Bell Jar Book Review

By tess Alekseev

Sylvia Plath’s semi-autobiographical book The Bell Jar is a difficult topic. It’s the poet’s only novel, published in England just a month before her suicide in 1963, and posthumously in America in 1971.

On one hand, many argue that it’s a classic, and that it should be compulsory in high school literature courses: it’s witty, it’s heartbreaking, and it reaches to impossible depths of the human psyche. On the other, it’s criticized for being too depressing, too graphic, and try-hard.

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News Briefs

The biggest local, national, and international news stories from the past month

Excellence for Dexter Students

by Isabella Franklin

An individual group named “Excellence 4 Dexter Students,” or E4DS, is trying to raise $100,000 in donations this school year to improve Dexter Community Schools. Their current goals are to send all 6th graders to Eastern Michigan University’s Explorer Camp, expand the math and science departments, and, most prominently for high school students, hire a part-time internship coordinator. An internship coordinator at the high school would give students more opportunities to learn outside of school and gain valuable experience in the workforce.

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Club Sport Struggles

The difference between school and club sports is unfair

By JIllian Chesney

Here at Dexter High School, there are many sports that are not recognized by the school, and subsequently are categorized as club sports. Field hockey, lacrosse, freshmen baseball, water polo, and equestrian are the club sports at DHS. These sports are only given a varstiy letter if they meet the set requirements. Continue reading “Club Sport Struggles”

Our View: Homecoming is Outdated and Needs to Change

By the Squall Staff

The homecoming dance at Dexter High School is an unfortunate casualty of the times. Something once so revered with a central spot in high school life has become little more than a reason to throw a party anywhere but the school. Year after year, without relief, the dance itself has been watered down into something that barely constitutes a dance, let alone something meaningful or worthwhile to attend. The mobilization of dozens of chaperones, the acquisition of a DJ without a Spotify account, and the brilliant idea of turning on the cafeteria lights during a dance are all now parts of our Homecoming traditions.

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A School Divided

A look inside Dexter High School’s policies and opinions surrounding the Confederate flag

By Joe Ramey

“It doesn’t mean anything bad to me. It’s just a flag. A flag that represents the South and the U.S.’s history,” DHS junior Cam Revill said. “I’m not afraid to wear it.”

Students like Revill are allowed to display the Confederate flag however they want. You can see it on t-shirts, backpacks, and the back of cars. Why can they do this? Dexter Community Schools does not have an explicit policy surrounding the advocation for or the displaying of the Confederate flag.

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Fall Sports Update

A broad look into the world of fall sports

By  Kellen Porter, MITCHELL STERLITZ, & Mike Waltz

 

Women’s Swim and Dive

Dexter women’s swim and dive team has started off strong this year, promising another year of dominance. They have shown a lot of potential and are working on continuing to build their legacy.

“Our goal is to aim for 20 straight years of winning SECs” said sophomore Elizabeth Merz when asked about the district swim meet.

Merz also says the team chemistry is “really great”, which is manifested in all of the motivational posters the girls make for one another.ome may assume swimming is an individual sport, and they’d be right in most cases. But one look at the Dreads and it’s obvious that when one girl swims, the whole team is right there with her, cheering her on.

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Take A Knee

If you’re worried about the flag, you’re missing the point

By Tessa Kipke

Michael Brown was just 18 years old when he was gunned down by a white police officer. He was unarmed. Eric Garner was strangled to death in public while repeating “I can’t breathe” over and over again. The police officer who killed him went unpunished. Kendra James was 21 and the mother of two. Philando Castile was 32, and his girlfriend and her young daughter were in the car with him.

These stories of unjust and tragic police brutality against black Americans are disgustingly common and horrifyingly repetitive; they show up constantly in ours news cycle, and the debates that follow are always the same. Continue reading “Take A Knee”

Supremacy Reigns

After years of following a traditional Homecoming court structure, DHS jumps ship to a court of royalty rather than King and Queen

By Jacoby Haley and Tess Alekseev

And now, announcing your Homecoming Supreme Royalty…

Wait, what? Homecoming court has always been known as a high school staple, but for Dexter it just became a little different.  Faculty members and the student council recently decided to change the traditional Homecoming court: The titles of “King” and “Queen” will now be “Supreme Royalty,” and “Prince” and “Princess” will be “Royalty.”

This change is to be the first of many changes to add inclusivity, a principle some feel has been historically missing  in our high school. Staff members told the Squall said they understand there will be push back about this change.

Despite this, these staff members still stand behind the change. Continue reading “Supremacy Reigns”

An Expensive Reality

The Chicago Rail, one of the most complex in the US.  Daniel Schwen
                                  By Tate Evans
Through seedy backroom deals at Congress and public speeches by the president, tax reform is slowly forming into the next Category 5 hurricane to hit the American mainland this year. Fueled by an urge to provide something, anything, to a desperate base and whirled by democrat winds whispering something about the top one percent, it’s looking less a bipartisan issue.

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