Rated R

The Dexter community makes an effort to eliminate a harmful word through the Spread the Word to End the Word campaign

By Joe Ramey

 

“I used to use it – the word retard. It was just normal,” explains a Dexter High School student. “It was just a social saying. Older kids said it, so I had some influences.”

When this student used the term retard, he was not only using someone’s disability as a comparative adjective to something else, he was desensitizing the word, allowing for it to become popularized and a working facet of people’s vocabulary.

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Remember the 40’s

Dexter icon Louie Ceriani is doing his best to help keep memories of Dexter’s roaring past from being forgotten

By Truman Stovall

People remember Dexter for the tornado and maybe its involvement in the Civil War, but with time turning every recollection of the past hazier every day, it’s important to keep strong memories alive before they’re lost forever.

In the 1940s, Dexter had a population of around 800 people. Despite the downtown area being nearly the same size as it is today, filled with various shops and manufacturing facilities, it still felt cramped. From high school kids walking to the confectionary store to eat burgers, drink Cherry Coke, and listen to jukebox music, to having difficulty finding a parking spot on the weekends as the whole town went bar-hopping between each of the four-or-five locations, it was easy to run into a familiar face.

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Letter From The Editor – Claire Ward

After a year of cramming to meet deadlines and proof-reading countless articles, this liberal feminist is moving away from DHS, and from being The Squall’s Editor-in-Chief.

BY Claire Ward

This may be the most anticipated and most hated article I’ve ever written. Oh well, here goes.

I’ve spent nine months as Editor-in-Chief of The Squall, and man has it been a wild ride. From people telling me I’m trying to push my liberal agenda on the school, to having a good portion of the freshman male population hate me because I’m “bossy” and talk about periods.

It’s been fun.

Now, this school finally gets a break from my feminist rants and corrective terminology. No more having to read articles about how white privilege is a big issue in this school, or that dress codes are sexist.

There’s one last thing I have to do before I leave, though.

This one goes out to everyone who read my articles and agreed with them. Who was grateful someone was finally saying there’s nothing wrong with menstruation, who liked it when someone wasn’t afraid to call out others for ignoring the Black Lives Matter protests and deaths of protesters.

To everyone who is glad I wasn’t afraid to stand up to my own beliefs; this article is for you.

Feminism isn’t an odd concept. It isn’t hard to agree with (yet many people still struggle to agree), nor is it impossible to achieve. Equality of all people in terms of social, political, and economic factors is a reasonable request. For some reason, we have to fight for it. And that’s what we need to continue doing, fighting.

People may not agree with me on all topics, but I think everyone can agree with me on one thing: I’ve sparked conversation here at Dexter High School. Whether good or bad, people have been talking about my articles and topics I’ve discussed. A feminist fire has been lit, and it’s up to everyone staying in this school to keep it that way.

All you feminists out there, stand up for your beliefs. Don’t be afraid to tell someone they’ve got an idea wrong, or that the comment they made was inaccurate or harmful.

All you who don’t want to label yourself as feminist, whether because there’s a stigma around the word or because a few people have soiled the word for you, stand up for your beliefs. Don’t let the fear of repercussions hold yourself back from actively vocalizing for equality of others.

All you who don’t label yourself as a feminist because you don’t believe in feminism, keep doing what you’re doing. There’s just one thing I encourage you to do: look into why others are fighting. Explore reasons behind why feminism is a relevant need in our society. Open yourself up to other viewpoints, and reconsider your own.

So, that’s it. After nine months as active Editor-in-Chief, I leave knowing I’ve left a lasting mark on our school and a good portion in it. It’s up to everyone else to keeping acting on it and make sure it resonates for a long time.

ALFK – Own Up To It.

It’s time to stop getting upset at human rights, and start fighting for them.

By Claire Ward

My last article discussing the Black Lives Matter movement and racism towards the African American community, received quite a bit of backlash. People threw my article in urinals (for aiming practice, I believe – but I hope if you’re in high school you don’t need help with that anymore), balled them up and threw them at my younger sister, tossed them on the ground, and broke out into “All Lives Matter” chants in their classrooms. Honestly, I find this very interesting. Why is it so hard for Dexter High School to hear it has a race problem? We say it all the time; Dexter’s lack of diversity has become a long running joke. So, why does such a large problem arise when it’s in print?

Hearing things that call out unknown, or unacknowledged, privileges can make us uncomfortable or angry. We like to believe that we’re all good people, doing the best we can. Or, at least, that we aren’t disregarding entire groups of people. So, when some dumb 18-year-old girl comes in and tells you you’re ignoring serious social issues, we tend to get upset. This anger can be justified by one simple line: “When you’re accustomed to privilege, equality feels like oppression.”

When others ask us to acknowledge privilege, we start to feel guilty. The word “privilege” has connotations of guilt in our society. People feel as though they are being blamed for the privilege they have. The truth is, we can’t control privilege. We can’t control having it, or being a part of a privileged group or community. There shouldn’t be blame behind it. Yet, there is, and we still tend to feel this way.

Why exactly do we feel this way? Why does privilege sound synonymous to guilt? A lot of it has to do with age-old stigma. Classical conditioning has led us to associate privilege with the upper-class royalty who treated people poorly (think Marie Antoinette). But, privilege is more than just being born into the uppermost class. This guilt we feel is outdated, and something we need to surpass as a whole society.

But the backlash towards my BLM article wasn’t just about privilege. It was also about an inability to deal with the idea that we may not be as good of humans as we think we are.

Many of us believe that we aren’t doing any bad, that we stay out of other drama, and don’t contribute to the troubles of others. Here’s the thing: doing nothing is exactly that. You aren’t helping or hurting anyone, so you aren’t doing anything. Desmond Tutu said, “If you are neutral in situations of injustice, you have chosen the side of the oppressor,” and it explains things pretty well. I said that we have a race problem in our country; the incarcerated population is almost half black, while only 13 percent of the American population is black, and people got upset. Because how could you have anything to do with putting people in jail? We’re just high school students completely separated from these situations.

Here’s a question for you: is the race problem in Dexter a reflection of the race problem in the US? The way we address race here is similar to the rest of the country: dismissal. Racist comments are said every day, but instead of addressing them we brush them off and ignore the fact that people here joke about being black (when we are so white). Our race problem isn’t just a race problem, it’s a social injustice problem that stretches across such a wide range of topics that is not limited to race or gender.

We don’t really make an attempt to fight against the injustice. We just sit on the outside, choosing to ignore the many faces of police brutality, or women in the global sex trade, or the biggest starvation crisis since 1945 going on in Yemen, South Sudan, Somalia, and northeast Nigeria.

So, when some dumb high school feminist tells us we’re adding to the problem, we get upset. We stand isolated in our little community, watching as outsiders who may think they can’t do anything. Or, maybe you just really don’t care about it and listening to someone who does care annoys you. Or, maybe you do feel this guilt in knowing you have privilege, and you’d rather ignore that rather than face it (if not guilt, then maybe white fragility). The fact is it doesn’t matter how you feel. I won’t stop fighting for what I believe, and it’s time other people take a stand for themselves, too. We, as a society, can’t stop this feeling of guilt alone, nor can we stop child labor, rape culture, or violence against the LGBTQ+ community.

It’s time to stop the little pity parties of ‘Oh my god, she’s so annoying. No one cares about this. This is bull. She hates police, and BLM is a terrorist movement’ (it’s not). It’s time to step up, acknowledge problems facing our world, and start working in aid towards them.

Rock ‘n Roll Making Cents

DHS Students enjoyed a concert from Gooding that mixed in financial tips with head-banging music

By Nick Elliott

When senior Brad Larson thinks of rock and roll, many things come to mind: Stage-crawling fans, smashing guitars, roaring crowds, and radical solos. What happens when you switch out the rush smashing guitars to something dull like balancing a checkbook?

On Friday, April 21, the rock and roll band Gooding came to DHS to answer that question for Larson and the rest of the students.

Mixing finance and rock might come off as a rather unattractive combination. Yet Gooding was able to make something that is inherently boring into an interesting experience for more than 150 students who ventured to the CPA to take in the concert.

Starting out with a brief video introduction, the band quickly jumped into the music. Gooding played several songs that got some students to stand up, clap, and sing along to the beat.

“I went to get out of second and third hour, and I was expecting some knockoff, third-rate local band, but I got a pretty well-traveled and respected group that I hadn’t heard of,” junior Connor Povenski said. “It was a really good concert. For such a big-name band to take the time to come to a local high school, that was really important. It really impacted me.”

After the approximately 45-minute concert ended, the majority of the band receded backstage. The lead singer, Gooding, stayed on stage to talk about important financial issues.

No stranger to financial woes, Gooding reflected on his personal financial troubles before talking about money myths and how many of the “rich” people students see on TV are broke and bankrupt.

Growing up, he had no knowledge of money. He came out of high school knowing more about geometry than how to balance a checkbook, and he only learned about a credit score long after he ruined his.

By looked into mistakes he had made, he wanted to use his passion for music to help others avoid the same mistakes.

“As long as you’re willing to work, everyone should have the same shot,” Gooding said.

When Gooding finished sharing his financial expertise, a Q&A session was held. Students in the crowd asked their own questions about finance, eager to hear the replies.

To conclude the event, the band came out and played one last song. Gooding then took time to sign autographs and talked to several students.

Gooding brought music and learning to DHS, but they were not alone in their efforts. Through the charity Funding the Future, the efforts Andrea Duda with Raymond James, and the Michigan Council on Economic Education (MCEE), the tour was made possible.

Financial management teacher Paige Lumpiesz felt Gooding had a “great message about personal finance” that can help people avoid financial “pitfalls.”

Signs Point to Controversy

Billboards were proposed near Dexter schools to gain additional revenue; board tables discussions

By: Nick LeBlanc and Caden Koenig

To kick off the year, Dexter Community Schools created a proposal to increase revenue for all of its constituent schools. The proposal is for two electronic billboards that would project advertisements.

According to dexterschools.org, the billboards are predicted to generate over $40,000 each year (twenty thousand each). The billboards are planned to be placed on the corner of Shield and Baker Road and on Dexter-Ann Arbor Road, east of the current traffic light. To go along with the two billboards, the proposal also included a request for one pedestrian-actuated warning system — a crosswalk much like the one already on Shield Road, where lights flash to warn passing cars of pedestrians. This would make the trip shorter and safer for students who walk or bike to school. Lastly, the school would get free advertising at anytime on both of the billboards.

If the billboards do become a reality, according to dexterschools.org, every advertisement has to follow Board Policy 9700, which states that there cannot be any advertisements that promote alcohol, drugs, sex, religion, political opinion, violence, or R-rated material.

The reason for the proposal of these signs is that they would help the school district immensely with funding for certain academic necessities that run out near the end of the school year, such as lined paper. In addition, planners have been fading out due to lack of funding, leaving students without the commodity that has been consistently provided at the high school in previous years. Some teachers at the high school have discussed the positive outlook on the billboard project’s ability to provide revenue for the school.

“Wherever the revenue ends up, it will hopefully loosen up money from the general fund for other student-driven initiatives,” DHS math teacher Paige Lumpiesz said.

However, as always, there is opposition to this proposal too. People feel like the light pollution could be annoying, the billboards could be distracting, and some don’t see why the school system can’t just pursue a grant.

Some opposition may be unwarranted, however, because according to the proposal, the billboards have no light effect on any nearby houses due to their low-light nature. The proposal continues by saying neighboring houses with porch lights on will have more of an effect than the billboards. The argument that they may present a distraction is viable. The distraction to drivers is a possible danger because there are constantly new drivers going to and from the high school, and they could grab the attention of experienced drivers too much as well.

As of early March, discussions between concerned citizens and the school board in regards to the new billboards have been pushed back until later in the year.

How to: Politics

A complete guide explaining how to navigate yourself through politics at DHS

By Tyler Valentine

Politics have been a sensitive topic of conversation at DHS recently. There are people whose new trigger word is Trump, and other people that will take the excitement of him winning the election to their grave. It seems as if people are having trouble sharing their opinion without offending others or just taking it to unnecessary extremes. If we can all follow these three simple steps, our school will become a much more enjoyable place to be, and we could bring social media back to better times

Step 1: Sharing your opinion

Liberals:

Guys, we get it, Hillary lost, our country is doomed and the world is more likely than not going to burst into flames. Seriously though… it’s been two months. It’s time to get over it and accept, despite your hashtags, Donald Trump is your president. People want to hear you cry about that just as much as you want to hear people celebrating about Trump

Conservatives:

Congratulations, Donald Trump has won the election and is now the most powerful man in the world. We are all very aware of this. So, just like the Hillary supporters, feel free to stop celebrating anytime now. How would you feel if Hillary had won and her supporters were still talking about

Step 2: Social media

Liberals:

The best way to go about politics on social media is to just keep the two completely seperate. I’m sorry to break it to you, but seeing someone tweet things such as “#NotMyPresident” annoys the majority of your followers just as much as when you see someone retweeting Cloyd Rivers.

Conservatives:

Now I’m not totally against the Cloyd Rivers account. Some of it is positive things about veterans that nobody minds reading. It’s seeing my timeline full of Cloyd Rivers that angers me. Don’t play dumb. We all know the difference between good tweets and ones meant to piss someone off.

Step 3: Accepting other opinions

Liberals:

Remember the Golden Rule? One of the first things we were taught way back in kindergarten? Well, if not, it stated: “Treat others how you wish to be treated.” I’m sorry to say it, but the liberals seem to be the ones that are the least accepting of political opinions. I know they’re always preaching about how we all should be accepting of race, religion, etc. yet continue to ridicule conservatives for what they believe in. I may be wrong, but that seems pretty hypocritical to me.

Conservatives:

Conservatives, don’t think you’re off the hook with the whole Golden Rule idea. I see how you try to play victim for the liberals judging you based on your opinion, yet you do the same thing. In the end, we are all the same, judgemental people with views that slightly differ from one another. So how about instead of criticizing each other we look at ourselves first.

We all just need to take a deep breath and chill on the politics, both on social media and just in general. I don’t think I’m alone in saying that I would like nothing more than to have a politics-free social media and school environment. Let’s all just be more accepting of each other’s beliefs and maybe take a second to see them for more than just their face value. If you think you’re right and anybody that doesn’t think exactly like you is wrong, please, for the well-being of everyone around you, keep it to yourself.

Senior Wrestlers Take Over The Palace

Will Feldkamp claims second while Kyle Burton finishes eighth to lead the Dreads at the state finals in Auburn Hills

By: Tyler Woelfel

Four Dexter wrestlers, all seniors, had great seasons that culminated in the Michigan state finals. Adam Burton wrestled in the 160-lb weight class as he appeared in his first state finals. For his first time wrestling at states, he did well but was unable to place. Wrestling in the 152-lb weight class, his brother Kyle Burton did great, earning a spot on the podium for eighth place in Division 2. Ryan Clements, wrestling at 119 pounds, earned his hundredth win this year, capping off a great high school career. Clements did well at the Palace, but he was unable to place. The fourth wrestler to make it to Auburn Hills was William Feldkamp. Feldkamp is in the 189-lb weight class and was the only wrestler to repeat a regional title to bring him back to the state finals. This year, Feldkamp was trying to cap off an amazing career at Dexter High School by winning the state championship. He had some extra pressure when wrestling that weekend; The Feldkamp family’s wrestling history is arguably the best in Dexter. They have always dominated, and the latest Feldkamp definitely lived up to that tradition throughout his four years in high school. He got off to a hot start at states by pinning two opponents in a row. Heading into the semifinal match, he said he was very nervous. The match went down to the wire after he was able to force an overtime period. He stuck it out and was able to win the match, giving him a chance at a state title. In the finals, he faced last year’s state champion, Warren Lincoln’s Jelani Embree. After a hard-fought match, Feldkamp fell just short, 7-2, finishing second in the state. All four seniors finished off their final season as a Dreadnaught with an accomplishment most people can’t say they have, and for that reason, this year was incredibly successful for the wrestling team as a whole and the individuals involved as well.