Letter From The Editor – Claire Ward

After a year of cramming to meet deadlines and proof-reading countless articles, this liberal feminist is moving away from DHS, and from being The Squall’s Editor-in-Chief.

BY Claire Ward

This may be the most anticipated and most hated article I’ve ever written. Oh well, here goes.

I’ve spent nine months as Editor-in-Chief of The Squall, and man has it been a wild ride. From people telling me I’m trying to push my liberal agenda on the school, to having a good portion of the freshman male population hate me because I’m “bossy” and talk about periods.

It’s been fun.

Now, this school finally gets a break from my feminist rants and corrective terminology. No more having to read articles about how white privilege is a big issue in this school, or that dress codes are sexist.

There’s one last thing I have to do before I leave, though.

This one goes out to everyone who read my articles and agreed with them. Who was grateful someone was finally saying there’s nothing wrong with menstruation, who liked it when someone wasn’t afraid to call out others for ignoring the Black Lives Matter protests and deaths of protesters.

To everyone who is glad I wasn’t afraid to stand up to my own beliefs; this article is for you.

Feminism isn’t an odd concept. It isn’t hard to agree with (yet many people still struggle to agree), nor is it impossible to achieve. Equality of all people in terms of social, political, and economic factors is a reasonable request. For some reason, we have to fight for it. And that’s what we need to continue doing, fighting.

People may not agree with me on all topics, but I think everyone can agree with me on one thing: I’ve sparked conversation here at Dexter High School. Whether good or bad, people have been talking about my articles and topics I’ve discussed. A feminist fire has been lit, and it’s up to everyone staying in this school to keep it that way.

All you feminists out there, stand up for your beliefs. Don’t be afraid to tell someone they’ve got an idea wrong, or that the comment they made was inaccurate or harmful.

All you who don’t want to label yourself as feminist, whether because there’s a stigma around the word or because a few people have soiled the word for you, stand up for your beliefs. Don’t let the fear of repercussions hold yourself back from actively vocalizing for equality of others.

All you who don’t label yourself as a feminist because you don’t believe in feminism, keep doing what you’re doing. There’s just one thing I encourage you to do: look into why others are fighting. Explore reasons behind why feminism is a relevant need in our society. Open yourself up to other viewpoints, and reconsider your own.

So, that’s it. After nine months as active Editor-in-Chief, I leave knowing I’ve left a lasting mark on our school and a good portion in it. It’s up to everyone else to keeping acting on it and make sure it resonates for a long time.

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