People in Limbo

How our under the bed approach to refugees is in drastic need of repair

By Tate Evans

We live in interesting times, a point in history where almost 20 million people are given the label of refugee. They crossed borders not because they wanted to but because they were forced to by persecution and violence.However, we are woefully failing in responding to their needs, and many of us simply don’t know it even if they have the best of intentions. The average response many of us would think to respond to refugees is to go out and donate to the United Nations humanitarian system, where they would go build camps for the refugees until they could go home. But instead of waiting a few years, these people end up waiting decades in inhumane conditions, effectively condemned to waste their lives outside of society

However, we are woefully failing in responding to their needs, and many of us simply don’t know it even if they have the best of intentions. The average response many of us would think to respond to refugees is to go out and donate to the United Nations humanitarian system, where they would go build camps for the refugees until they could go home. But instead of waiting a few years, these people end up waiting decades in inhumane conditions, effectively condemned to waste their lives outside of society

Continue reading “People in Limbo”

Our Generation’s Taste

The problem with music today and how our generation glorifies the seemingly untalented

By Joe Ramey

In a world of classics and musical talents, this generation of teenagers seems to take a liking to overly edited, and somewhat untalented artists who are just as uncreative as the last. With exceptions too few, the last decade is riddled with artists and songs that are shameful in some regards when put up against its predecessors.

Continue reading “Our Generation’s Taste”

Letter from the Editors

Opinions of a teenager who may or may not be qualified to offer life advice but is going to do it anyway

By Caden Koenig

We made it. Thirteen years in the Dexter system. Same faces and places. Most likely, at least for me, my friends have been the same since I went to Bates.

I have gained and lost a few along the way, but the main core of friends I have known for majority of my life. That might be the hardest part for me; Thinking about leaving seems so appealing at some point, but then the next minute you are unsure how you will make it without the family and friends that have been there with you.

Continue reading “Letter from the Editors”

Letters from the Editors

Opinions of a teenager who may or may not be qualified to offer life advice but is going to do it anyway

By Nick LeBlanc

 

It’s been 17 years at Dexter, 12 in Dexter schools, four in high school, and three on The Squall staff.

High School has been a wild ride. As cliche as it might sound, DHS has provided all of us with ups and downs throughout our four year journey. We’ve made everlasting friendships and memories, and at the same time, met people we would rather forget. Continue reading “Letters from the Editors”

Dear Freshman me,

After four years of reflection at DHS, here is a letter of things no one mentioned before ninth grade

    By Marissa Rafail

I’ve got some things to say to you, so listen closely. For starters, high school won’t always be the nicest to you; I’ll be honest. 9th grade especially is going to be your least favorite year. The overwhelming dramatic changes will take you by storm. When you walk into the new school, you’re basically walking into a building of confusion. To top it off, there’s going to be boys and books, along with new and old friendships to deal with. Continue reading “Dear Freshman me,”

Censorship at Dexter

A look back on school dances and how they are an example of over-the-top censorship at DHS

By Andy dolen

 

Reminiscing on the past four years at DHS, I am happy with how my high school career turned out; however, the high school experience at Dexter is noticeably different than in your average high school.

Unfortunately, we live in a bubble where we are not always impacted by things that are happening around us. This impacts the way students and their parents think a normal high school should function. Continue reading “Censorship at Dexter”

Remember Avatar?

The majority of DHS students barely remember the highest-grossing film of all time

by megan sarns

As far as movies go, it’s the age of the blockbuster. These high budget and highly anticipated films seldom make an appearance on Academy Award rosters, but they rake in millions of dollars and take the cinema world by storm. Franchises like Star Wars and the Marvel Cinematic Universe (i.e. The Avengers and Captain America) lead the pack with several of the highest grossing films in history.

But the highest grossing film of all time doesn’t feature superheroes or an intergalactic battle against the Dark Side or Vin Diesel street racing through Los Angeles –– because even those movies are still making money somehow. Raking in approximately $2.8 billion at the box office, Avatar is the most successful movie of all time.

Continue reading “Remember Avatar?”

Just Dance

Be in the spotlight, bust out the worm, or ask her if she wants to slow dance with you. Who cares? You do you.

BY RACHEL WITTENBERG

What happened to Footloose and Grease Lightening where dancing was the highlight of the night? Where the girl is waiting for the blue eyed boy in the bow tie and suspenders to ask her to dance.

I know there are many reasons why youngins don’t get down and boogie at school dances nowadays. For some, it is the teachers staring down at their every move waiting to pounce at the first sign of dry humping on a gym floor. Or maybe it’s the fact that the lights are brighter than they are on a normal school day. Or, the music isn’t “club” like, enough. Continue reading “Just Dance”

Letter From The Editor – Claire Ward

After a year of cramming to meet deadlines and proof-reading countless articles, this liberal feminist is moving away from DHS, and from being The Squall’s Editor-in-Chief.

BY Claire Ward

This may be the most anticipated and most hated article I’ve ever written. Oh well, here goes.

I’ve spent nine months as Editor-in-Chief of The Squall, and man has it been a wild ride. From people telling me I’m trying to push my liberal agenda on the school, to having a good portion of the freshman male population hate me because I’m “bossy” and talk about periods.

It’s been fun.

Now, this school finally gets a break from my feminist rants and corrective terminology. No more having to read articles about how white privilege is a big issue in this school, or that dress codes are sexist.

There’s one last thing I have to do before I leave, though.

This one goes out to everyone who read my articles and agreed with them. Who was grateful someone was finally saying there’s nothing wrong with menstruation, who liked it when someone wasn’t afraid to call out others for ignoring the Black Lives Matter protests and deaths of protesters.

To everyone who is glad I wasn’t afraid to stand up to my own beliefs; this article is for you.

Feminism isn’t an odd concept. It isn’t hard to agree with (yet many people still struggle to agree), nor is it impossible to achieve. Equality of all people in terms of social, political, and economic factors is a reasonable request. For some reason, we have to fight for it. And that’s what we need to continue doing, fighting.

People may not agree with me on all topics, but I think everyone can agree with me on one thing: I’ve sparked conversation here at Dexter High School. Whether good or bad, people have been talking about my articles and topics I’ve discussed. A feminist fire has been lit, and it’s up to everyone staying in this school to keep it that way.

All you feminists out there, stand up for your beliefs. Don’t be afraid to tell someone they’ve got an idea wrong, or that the comment they made was inaccurate or harmful.

All you who don’t want to label yourself as feminist, whether because there’s a stigma around the word or because a few people have soiled the word for you, stand up for your beliefs. Don’t let the fear of repercussions hold yourself back from actively vocalizing for equality of others.

All you who don’t label yourself as a feminist because you don’t believe in feminism, keep doing what you’re doing. There’s just one thing I encourage you to do: look into why others are fighting. Explore reasons behind why feminism is a relevant need in our society. Open yourself up to other viewpoints, and reconsider your own.

So, that’s it. After nine months as active Editor-in-Chief, I leave knowing I’ve left a lasting mark on our school and a good portion in it. It’s up to everyone else to keeping acting on it and make sure it resonates for a long time.

ALFK – Own Up To It.

It’s time to stop getting upset at human rights, and start fighting for them.

By Claire Ward

My last article discussing the Black Lives Matter movement and racism towards the African American community, received quite a bit of backlash. People threw my article in urinals (for aiming practice, I believe – but I hope if you’re in high school you don’t need help with that anymore), balled them up and threw them at my younger sister, tossed them on the ground, and broke out into “All Lives Matter” chants in their classrooms. Honestly, I find this very interesting. Why is it so hard for Dexter High School to hear it has a race problem? We say it all the time; Dexter’s lack of diversity has become a long running joke. So, why does such a large problem arise when it’s in print?

Hearing things that call out unknown, or unacknowledged, privileges can make us uncomfortable or angry. We like to believe that we’re all good people, doing the best we can. Or, at least, that we aren’t disregarding entire groups of people. So, when some dumb 18-year-old girl comes in and tells you you’re ignoring serious social issues, we tend to get upset. This anger can be justified by one simple line: “When you’re accustomed to privilege, equality feels like oppression.”

When others ask us to acknowledge privilege, we start to feel guilty. The word “privilege” has connotations of guilt in our society. People feel as though they are being blamed for the privilege they have. The truth is, we can’t control privilege. We can’t control having it, or being a part of a privileged group or community. There shouldn’t be blame behind it. Yet, there is, and we still tend to feel this way.

Why exactly do we feel this way? Why does privilege sound synonymous to guilt? A lot of it has to do with age-old stigma. Classical conditioning has led us to associate privilege with the upper-class royalty who treated people poorly (think Marie Antoinette). But, privilege is more than just being born into the uppermost class. This guilt we feel is outdated, and something we need to surpass as a whole society.

But the backlash towards my BLM article wasn’t just about privilege. It was also about an inability to deal with the idea that we may not be as good of humans as we think we are.

Many of us believe that we aren’t doing any bad, that we stay out of other drama, and don’t contribute to the troubles of others. Here’s the thing: doing nothing is exactly that. You aren’t helping or hurting anyone, so you aren’t doing anything. Desmond Tutu said, “If you are neutral in situations of injustice, you have chosen the side of the oppressor,” and it explains things pretty well. I said that we have a race problem in our country; the incarcerated population is almost half black, while only 13 percent of the American population is black, and people got upset. Because how could you have anything to do with putting people in jail? We’re just high school students completely separated from these situations.

Here’s a question for you: is the race problem in Dexter a reflection of the race problem in the US? The way we address race here is similar to the rest of the country: dismissal. Racist comments are said every day, but instead of addressing them we brush them off and ignore the fact that people here joke about being black (when we are so white). Our race problem isn’t just a race problem, it’s a social injustice problem that stretches across such a wide range of topics that is not limited to race or gender.

We don’t really make an attempt to fight against the injustice. We just sit on the outside, choosing to ignore the many faces of police brutality, or women in the global sex trade, or the biggest starvation crisis since 1945 going on in Yemen, South Sudan, Somalia, and northeast Nigeria.

So, when some dumb high school feminist tells us we’re adding to the problem, we get upset. We stand isolated in our little community, watching as outsiders who may think they can’t do anything. Or, maybe you just really don’t care about it and listening to someone who does care annoys you. Or, maybe you do feel this guilt in knowing you have privilege, and you’d rather ignore that rather than face it (if not guilt, then maybe white fragility). The fact is it doesn’t matter how you feel. I won’t stop fighting for what I believe, and it’s time other people take a stand for themselves, too. We, as a society, can’t stop this feeling of guilt alone, nor can we stop child labor, rape culture, or violence against the LGBTQ+ community.

It’s time to stop the little pity parties of ‘Oh my god, she’s so annoying. No one cares about this. This is bull. She hates police, and BLM is a terrorist movement’ (it’s not). It’s time to step up, acknowledge problems facing our world, and start working in aid towards them.