60s Cult Leader Dead at 83

Charles Manson dies after 46 years behind bars

By tess alekseev

On Sunday, November 19th, the iconoclastic Manson family leader, Charles Manson, died. In 1969, he directed his cult to murder seven people. The perpetrators have been living out lifelong prison sentences since their apprehension. The murders made Manson one of the most culturally iconic criminals of the 20th century, and multiple movies and books detail his life and the murders — and any new material will include his death. Manson died at 83 of natural causes in Bakersfield, CA.

Roundabout additions to Dexter

New roundabouts being put in to keep Dexter famliy’s safe

By Kellen Porter

Its that time of year again as the leaves are changing and the temperature is dropping fall is upon us in Dexter Michigan. Fall can be such a beautiful time,but everyone has experienced those late night drives home from the football game and the roads are quite slippy and it is not very visible due to the rain.In most cases people make it home fine but there are a few cases that have led to accidents due to lack of visibility along with weather conditions and people going faster than they should on those dirt roads.Therefore there will be roundabouts put in two separate areas of Dexter to make sure people are staying safe as the weather conditions worsen. There are many pros and cons to these two new roundabouts, for the people that like the roads they way they are I will state the cons. Continue reading “Roundabout additions to Dexter”

Positive Social Media App Sweeps DHS

By tess alekseev

This August, the anonymous messaging app TBH launched in Georgia. Since then, it has gained traction in other states, including Michigan.

It works like this: you enter your name, grade, gender, and school, then you add people from your suggested list. When you go leave comments on people’s profiles, it allows you to pick from a group of four people, and to pick the person that a superlative applies to. Examples include “looks stunning without even trying” and “has the guts to steal a car and drive to Vegas.” Continue reading “Positive Social Media App Sweeps DHS”

News Briefs

The biggest local, national, and international news stories from the past month

Excellence for Dexter Students

by Isabella Franklin

An individual group named “Excellence 4 Dexter Students,” or E4DS, is trying to raise $100,000 in donations this school year to improve Dexter Community Schools. Their current goals are to send all 6th graders to Eastern Michigan University’s Explorer Camp, expand the math and science departments, and, most prominently for high school students, hire a part-time internship coordinator. An internship coordinator at the high school would give students more opportunities to learn outside of school and gain valuable experience in the workforce.

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Irma’s ‘Perfect Storm’

Hurricane Irma, described as the “perfect storm,” tore through Southern Florida and surrounding islands, devastating families and destroying homes

By Evelyn Maxey & BAILEY WELSHANS

 

Here is the destructive path of Hurricane Irma. Irma formed on Aug. 30 in the Atlantic Ocean and hit the Florida Keys on Sept. 10. Source: weather.com

Hurricane Irma wasted no time after the devastation of Hurricane Harvey to start her own path of destruction. On August 30, 2017, the monumental storm struck parts of Cuba, the Virgin Islands, and southwestern Florida. Victims of the storm in the United States stretch from Naples, Florida, all the way to Albany, Georgia. Irma hit Florida as a Category 3 hurricane with winds of 115 MPH.

Continue reading “Irma’s ‘Perfect Storm’”

News Briefs

The biggest local, national, and international news stories that happened over the summer

Temple Mount Attack

by Tess Alekseev

Temple Mount lies near the Western Wall of Jerusalem in Israel, and it is hailed as a holy place for Muslim and Jewish people alike. On July 14th, there was a terror attack by three Israeli citizens of Palestinian origins who saw the recent surge in Jewish visitors to Temple Mount as an attack on the holiness of the site. After an intense shootout, two Druze cops were fatally shot along with the three gunmen. The attack prompted Israel to close Temple Mount for a brief period of time and to install metal detectors which angered Palestinian visitors. Jordan pressured Israel to take the detectors down. Eventually, Israel complied. Luckily, violence has since died down, and the fears of a third intifada did not come to light.

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Signs Point to Controversy

Billboards were proposed near Dexter schools to gain additional revenue; board tables discussions

By: Nick LeBlanc and Caden Koenig

To kick off the year, Dexter Community Schools created a proposal to increase revenue for all of its constituent schools. The proposal is for two electronic billboards that would project advertisements.

According to dexterschools.org, the billboards are predicted to generate over $40,000 each year (twenty thousand each). The billboards are planned to be placed on the corner of Shield and Baker Road and on Dexter-Ann Arbor Road, east of the current traffic light. To go along with the two billboards, the proposal also included a request for one pedestrian-actuated warning system — a crosswalk much like the one already on Shield Road, where lights flash to warn passing cars of pedestrians. This would make the trip shorter and safer for students who walk or bike to school. Lastly, the school would get free advertising at anytime on both of the billboards.

If the billboards do become a reality, according to dexterschools.org, every advertisement has to follow Board Policy 9700, which states that there cannot be any advertisements that promote alcohol, drugs, sex, religion, political opinion, violence, or R-rated material.

The reason for the proposal of these signs is that they would help the school district immensely with funding for certain academic necessities that run out near the end of the school year, such as lined paper. In addition, planners have been fading out due to lack of funding, leaving students without the commodity that has been consistently provided at the high school in previous years. Some teachers at the high school have discussed the positive outlook on the billboard project’s ability to provide revenue for the school.

“Wherever the revenue ends up, it will hopefully loosen up money from the general fund for other student-driven initiatives,” DHS math teacher Paige Lumpiesz said.

However, as always, there is opposition to this proposal too. People feel like the light pollution could be annoying, the billboards could be distracting, and some don’t see why the school system can’t just pursue a grant.

Some opposition may be unwarranted, however, because according to the proposal, the billboards have no light effect on any nearby houses due to their low-light nature. The proposal continues by saying neighboring houses with porch lights on will have more of an effect than the billboards. The argument that they may present a distraction is viable. The distraction to drivers is a possible danger because there are constantly new drivers going to and from the high school, and they could grab the attention of experienced drivers too much as well.

As of early March, discussions between concerned citizens and the school board in regards to the new billboards have been pushed back until later in the year.

The Day After

On March 16, 2012, the Dexter community quickly came together to overcome a natural disaster that affected many

By: Nick LeBlanc and Caden Koenig

The peace that preceded the tornado was followed by shock. Dexter’s bubble finally popped.  A community that once stood in silence came together. Adversity was a rare thing for the 4,127 citizens of Dexter to face, as nothing serious has ever happened in the small, peaceful town.

Before the sun rose that day, the streets of each neighborhood were packed with insurance companies, disaster relief companies, and newscasters getting prepared to deliver a story about  a village in southeast Michigan.  News about the tornado reached all over the nation reaching even to Hawaii.

Dexter exemplified a close knit community. Local businesses and restaurants donated food and other goods to the devastated areas. Busch’s played a key role in helping families by donating cases of water and having a cookout that night. To add to this, Mill Creek Middle School and Creekside Intermediate both combined with The Red Cross, and opened up their doors for people who needed a place to stay that night

Gloves, long pants, boots, protective eyewear, tools.  All were used to collectively gear up the people of Dexter.  Adults and kids alike came from all over the district to help the unfortunate families in Huron Farms, Horseshoe Bend, and numerous other businesses and households.  Kids ventured out into the neighborhood to help clean up the possessions of others like drywall, insulation, siding, furniture, roofing shingles, and, sadly, more.  Despite the chaos of the tornado, citizens of Dexter were at their friendliest.  People walked around with food and water for the affected and for the workers.  Businesses, like Busch’s by Huron Farms, opened their pantry to help feed families that lost their ability to fulfill the task of preparing something as basic as food.

The winds that the tornado produced equated to those consistent with an EF3 tornado; easily ripping through the seemingly insignificant village.  Over one hundred houses were hit and thirteen were completely totaled.  In total, the damage took a

In all, while the people may have had different opinions, goals, and lifestyles, in the end the community came together and put aside their differences.  This is because we’re all human and deserve love during times of grief.  By coming together during the tornado the people of Dexter shows why we live by one phrase: Dreadstong.

Memories from Members of DHS

Five years after the Dexter Tornado, two students, a teacher, and an administrator reflect on the how the day has changed their lives

By Megan Sarns and Julia Bell

Having formerly lived in Florida, sophomore Kara Young and her family are used to ominous weather conditions.

“We had hurricane after hurricane near our house,” she said.

So, when a storm started rolling into Dexter on March 15, she didn’t think much of it. The family was actually getting ready to go to church for weekly “Thursday night dinners.”

Continue reading “Memories from Members of DHS”